Tree Alert Page Topper

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Please be aware you will not be able to submit a report without uploading photographs of your observation.

Please provide your contact details in case we require more information.
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Title:
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Last name:(*)
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Address:
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In the case of the presence of certain pests and diseases we may need to contact the land owner. Please select from the following options:

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Data Protection: The Forestry Commission is a data controller under the Data Protection Act and we have a legal duty to protect your privacy and safeguard any personal information we collect from you. Any information you give us will be processed in a manner which meets the requirement of the Act. Access to your personal information will be strictly controlled and we will prevent any unauthorised access to it. Your report, including any personal information you have provided, may be passed to a trained Observatree volunteer who, if necessary, will make contact with you to gather more information. Observatree volunteers are all signatories of a data sharing agreement and will not pass on your details to any third party without your prior agreement. By submitting a report you are accepting the terms set out in this statement.

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(please note that if we suspect that your report is of a quarantine or significant pest or disease, we may have to contact you or the landowner for further information)

 
Please provide details of the land owner

Title:
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Last name:
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Address:
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Post code:
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Email address:
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Phone number:
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Please indicate your level of knowledge / experience
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When did you make the observation (dd-mm-yyyy)?(*)

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Where was the observation made?(*)
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Other
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Please provide details of where you made the observation. In most cases, this will be the location of the affected tree(s).
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Country where the observation was made(*)
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You must either enter a grid reference or mark a location on the map.

If entering a grid reference 10 figures are preferable but we will accept 8 or 6 figures.

The UK Grid Reference Finder can help if you want to enter a grid reference.

If you know the grid reference, please enter it here in the form:
AB1234567890, or
AB12345678, or
AB123456
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or, place a point on the map (use the pan and zoom functions to find the place where you made your observation, and then select ‘Draw Point’ in the Map Editing Tools to mark the spot:

If you know the post code, please enter it here
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otherwise, please describe the location and/or provide the site name
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(*) indicates a mandatory field

Are you reporting a pest/disease on a tree?

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Please indicate the number and size of the tree(s) affected
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How many trees are showing signs of poor condition(*)

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What is the approximate diameter of the stem / trunk?(*)

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Please indicate the age of the affected tree(s)
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Has the tree(s) been recently planted?(*)

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What is the approximate age of the trees affected?(*)

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Please indicate the general tree type(*)
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If you know the genus (group of species) to which the tree(s) belongs, please select from the drop down list of common names below

Tree Common Name
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If you know the exact species of tree, please select from the drop down list below

Tree Species
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Tree Species
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Please indicate where on the tree the symptoms occur. You can choose more than one part of the tree.






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Crown - what is the nature of the symptom?
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Stem - what is the nature of the symptom?
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Base - what is the nature of the symptom?
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To select/deselect multiple items from one list, hold down Ctrl while selecting.

Comments
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To complete the report we need you to upload at least 2 photographs of the affected trees.

The maximum file size is 8 MB.

(*) indicates a mandatory field

Please upload a photo that shows the affected tree(s) in context
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Please upload a photo that shows the symptoms / damage / insect in context on the affected tree
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If you have a photo that shows the detail of the symptoms / damage / insect, please upload that too
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If you have more images available, then please tick here:
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If more images/films are available on a publicly accessible site, please enter the URL(s) here:
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If you have photographs of the observed insect / larva(e), please upload them here.

Please upload a photo that shows the insect or the larva(e) in close-up
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If you have more images available, then please tick here:
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If more images/films are available on a publicly accessible site, please enter the URL(s) here:
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Observatree volunteers and our diagnosticians will now view your report and, if necessary, will investigate your case further. If you have provided consent, this may entail contacting you for further information or samples. Please note that not all reports will be followed up directly. However, every report will be used and will contribute to our understanding of tree health issues across Great Britain.

Thank you for completing your report. Please press the Submit button. NB your report may take a little while to submit.

 

Introduction to Chalara dieback of Ash

Chalara dieback is a serious disease of ash trees caused by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus (the asexual stage of which is known as Chalara fraxinea). Infection by the fungus causes leaf loss and crown dieback in a range of ash species, and the disease is frequently fatal.


Thought to have originated in Asia, the pathogen was first identified as the cause of a severe dieback of ash which became evident in eastern Europe in the early 1990s and had spread across much of continental Europe and Scandinavia by 2010. Chalara dieback was first recorded in Britain during 2012 – initially on newly imported plants and then on infected nursery stock which had been planted at various sites. Surveys in late 2012 and 2013 revealed that the disease was also present in established woodland and hedgerow trees in Britain and not just on recently planted saplings. Most of the outbreaks of Chalara dieback in the natural environment are currently confined to East Anglia and Kent, although an increasing number of outlying cases have been confirmed in other areas of England and in Scotland, particularly along the east coast. It is important that cases of the disease outwith the areas currently known to be affected are reported so that its distribution can be monitored and action taken by the plant health authorities where appropriate.


Symptoms of the disease can be visible on the leaves, shoots, branches or stems of affected trees. In severe cases, the entire crown shows leaf loss and dieback, which is often associated with the formation of recovery shoots on the branches and trunk. In early autumn, infected leaves typically display wilting and brownish-black discoloration which extends into the midrib and leaf stalk. Lens-shaped areas of bark death (lesions) centred on a dead side shoot are often visible on stems and branches. Wilting and dieback of shoots and branches may also be seen when lesions have girdled the branch or stem below. Occasionally, dark lesions ascending from the stem base may be found but these are unlikely to develop before crown dieback is seen on the affected trees.


In the following pages you will be asked some detailed questions concerning the trees about which you are concerned and the symptoms which they display. You will also be asked to upload digital photographs of the trees in order for us to determine whether they are likely to be infected by Hymenoscyphus fraxineus.. If you cannot provide this information at present you may wish to re-inspect and photograph the trees before submitting your report.

 

An Introduction to Dothistroma Needle Blight

Dothistroma Needle Blight (DNB), previously known as Red Band Needle Blight, is a fungal disease of pine trees. The fungus has very occasionally been found on other conifers, but has only been a problem on pines. Because of this, currently this DNB reporting line only takes reports of the disease on pine trees.


DNB usually has an annual life-cycle, infecting this summer’s newly-grown needles with spores ejected from fruitbodies on the needles that were infected the previous year.


DNB causes browning and loss of older needles, i.e. those needles that are further down the branch, not those at the branch tip. Current year’s needles (i.e. those at the branch tips) will remain green until at least late summer and usually show no clear symptoms until they are almost a year old.


In the pages that follow you will be asked some quite detailed questions, not only about the pattern of damage on the tree as a whole but also about the particular form of discolouration on the needles themselves. If you cannot provide this detail then you may find it useful to re-inspect the tree or trees about which you are concerned. Furthermore, the symptoms required for confirmation of Dothistroma Needle Blight are very rarely seen outside the summer months (April to September) and we recommend that you assess your tree(s) during June, July or August , as this is when the symptoms are most obvious.

 

Welcome to the Acute Oak Decline pages.

Please be aware that the external symptoms of Acute Oak Decline can be confused with other diseases. Our research seeks to systematically measure, monitor and improve understanding of the condition.


These pages have been produced to assist you in making an approximate identification of the disease. This also helps us to filter the reports we receive, and tailor our service.


This information is intended for guidance only, and not as a substitute for professional diagnosis and advice.

 

An introduction to Phytophthora lateralis

Phytophthora lateralis is a pathogen which generally attacks and kills the roots of certain trees, although aerial infections of branches and foliage also occur.


Thought to originate in Asia, the disease is the main cause of mortality in Lawson cypress (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana) in its native range in the west coast of North America, and outbreaks have been recorded in France and the Netherlands. The pathogen was first reported in the UK in 2010, most likely having been imported from mainland Europe, and it has since been found on sites across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It is important that suspected cases of the disease are reported.


Infected trees show rapid decline with foliage turning a rusty-red then a dull bronze over all or a large part of the crown. The pathogen also occasionally attacks the stem or branches, causing discrete aerial infections so that the foliage turns bronze or brown in large, isolated patches in the crown. Lawson cypress is the main species of tree likely to be infected by P. lateralis in Britain. Other susceptible hosts are Sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera), Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) and white cedar (Thuja occidentalis).


However, these conifers can be easily confused with other tree species, for example, the Leyland cypress (Cupressocyparis leylandii), which is not known to be susceptible to P. lateralis.

 

You have identified an Ash tree that has some symptoms consistent with Chalara fraxinea. We need to check the identification of the Ash before checking further symptoms.

 

The observations you have reported so far suggest a possible case of Dothistroma Needle Blight. We now need to ask you a few questions specifically related to this disease

 

The observations you have reported so far suggest a possible case of Acute Oak Decline. We now need to ask you a few questions specifically related to this condition.

 

The observations you have reported so far suggest a possible case of Phytophthora lateralis. We now need to ask you a few questions specifically related to the host and the disease.