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Introduction to Longhorn Beetles

Asian Longhorn Beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) and Citrus Longhorn Beetle (Anoplophora chinensis) are closely related and very similar looking beetles with highly damaging wood boring larvae (grubs).


They are native to parts of SE Asia (China, Korea and Japan) and over the past 20 years small numbers of individual beetles have been intercepted in the UK apparently having come into the country as larvae hidden inside either wood packaging material, potted trees for planting out (Acer species in particular ) or Bonsai specimens. Early in 2012 a small breeding colony of A.glabripennis was discovered in Kent and the Forestry Commission and Food & Environment Research Agency initiated an eradication programme.


The outbreak appears to have been eliminated but monitoring of the area will continue for some time to come.

 
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The immature stage of Asian Longhorn Beetle or Citrus Longhorn Beetle is referred to as a larva (grub), this is the damaging stage. A larva hatches from an egg inserted into the bark of a suitable host tree by an adult female beetle.

The larva feeds initially just under the bark then tunnels deeply into the wood, feeding as it goes. Should infested wood be processed an undamaged larva can continue to feed and develop even in very dry material. A new adult beetle may eventually emerge by cutting a neat exit hole.

 

A woodboring larva (grub) of Asian Longhorn Beetle and Citrus Longhorn Beetle can cause significant damage which remains evident long after the new adult beetle has emerged and dispersed.

A larva hatches from an egg laid by an adult female beetle. It feeds initially just under the bark then tunnels deeply into the wood, feeding as goes. Should infested wood be processed an undamaged larva can continue to feed and develop even in very dry material. A new adult beetle cuts a neat exit hole to emerge and disperse.

 
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If you have more images available, then please tick here:
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If you have, or are able to collect a sample of the beetle, larva(e) or damage, please click here:
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Observatree volunteers and our diagnosticians will now view your report and, if necessary, will investigate your case further. If you have provided consent, this may entail contacting you for further information or samples. Please note that not all reports will be followed up directly. However, every report will be used and will contribute to our understanding of tree health issues across Great Britain.

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